Buy Tickets

View Point

You can find the View Point tipi the Gathering Place area.

SATURDAY

Art at the heart of healing (11am)

Dr Anna Farthing is currently Arts Programme Director for University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust. Having curated visual art, music, poetry, boredom busters and more for patients and staff across the Trust, she is convinced that art is vital for the wellbeing of patients and wider society. In this intimate talk and Q&A, she will discuss her strategy for introducing art into the healing process – and how you too can benefit from regular creative engagement.


How can we connect children with food? (12 noon)

Panel discussion – Jo Ingleby, Chloe Smee and Zoe Williams

Jo Ingleby Jo was the winner of the BBC Cook of the Year 2015 for her work with children aged 2-4 at Redcliffe Children’s Centre and is passionate about getting children into the kitchen as young as possible.

Chloe has worked with Food for Life in various corners of the country for five years, supporting different localities to embed a good food culture through work with schools, early years settings, hospitals, care homes, vending machines and more! With a background in sustainability in local government, Chloe founded Edible York in 2009. She’s passionate about finding practical solutions towards an equitable, enriching food system. https://www.foodforlife.org.uk/

Zoe Williams, FareShare South West works with the food industry to receive their surplus food and redistribute to charities, community groups and schools across the region. Zoe spends her time talking to both potential and current members of the charity about the benefits of using surplus food to support the work that they do, and how food can be a catalyst for bringing people together.


How You Can Save The Bee (2pm)

Dr. Luke Dixon from the Bee Friendly Trust will be sharing how the honeybee is a vital part of our world and vital in the production of so much that we eat and drink. The bees need our help and this talk will tell us what we can do to help this wonderful little creature.

Dr Luke Dixon, Beekeeper and Co-Founder of the Bee Friendly Trust – aka the man on a mission to keep the nation’s bees happy. When Luke’s not busy looking after beehives across the rooftops of London (think sites such as Kensington Palace, Heathrow Airport, The British Museum and the Natural History Museum), he’s creating a network of pollinator-friendly flowering habitats around the UK. Working predominantly along railway lines, the Bee Friendly Trust installs planters, micro wildlife gardens and heritage fruit orchards on platforms and areas of abandoned land.


The Big Story of ‘Our Planet’ (3pm)

Wildlife film makers Dan Huertas and Jonnie Hughes, will explain how we can save Our Planet and reassure us it is good news!

They say: “The future is up to us. We have one simple objective: build a sustainable world – a world that benefits prosperity, people and planet. This is far from impossible – in fact it’s quite likely due to 3 things: 1. We’ve spent the last 50 years discovering all the problems, 2. We already know most of the solutions, and 3. in the next 50 years, the biggest problem, human population growth, will solve itself.

These ideas are the bedrock on which all our content was created throughout the talk we can give examples of them from things we have witnessed while making the content.They have enabled us to tell conservation stories which show a positive vision of the future.  If we make the smart choices now, the future will be amazing!”

With a passion for all things wild – except spiders – Dan Huertas finally found his natural home in Natural History film-making, relatively late. For the last few years Dan has produced and directed the creation of conservation short films for the global Netflix and WWF project, Our Planet.  Jonnie Hughes spent the last two decades working on all sorts of programmes from live shows like Springwatch, to most recently, a feature film with Sir David Attenborough. As supervising producer on the Netflix/WWF Our Planet project, he is in charge of making a raft of short films that explain to viewers of the series exactly how we can yet save Our Planet – and it is good news!


Panel – Can informed consumers make a difference? (4pm)

Ped Asgarian – Managing Director of The Community Farm – Ped has been working at The Community Farm for over 5 years. He also is a founding member and sits on the board of Bristol Food Producers, an organisation aiming to upscale local food production and distribution in Bristol.

Honor Eldridge is the Head of Policy for the Sustainable Food Trust. Her areas of focus include UK agricultural policy, international trade policy and agri-tech innovation.

Liz O’Neill is the Director of GM Freeze – the UK umbrella campaign for a moratorium on the use of genetic modification (GM) in food and farming. GM Freeze is working to help create a world in which everyone’s food is produced responsibly, fairly and sustainably.


Compost Squabbles (5pm)

Peter has been doing experiments on different compost systems for many years, mostly trying to minimise waste and make use of free materials. Jill is concerned to make nice compost that looks good and really works. These are two different philosophies and sometimes they clash. Peter will talk about his experiments using kitchen waste, woody materials, grass clippings, cardboard, urine and so-called ‘house juice’. Disgusting, says Jill. They will bring along samples, and hand-lenses that might reveal some of heroic small creatures that help recycle our waste. It’s all right — they will kiss and make up.

Peter Harper worked at the Centre for Alternative Technology for thirty years, and now teaches at the University of Bath. He is a geek. Jill Fenwick is an artist and garden designer. She is not a geek. Their websites say it all: www.peterharper.orgwww.jillfenwick.co.uk.

 

SUNDAY

Going the distance to make a difference (10 am)

Rob Pope certainly has a story or two to tell, and will be dazzling the audience at Valley Fest with his recent feat of running across America – not once, but four times in one year. Clocking over 15,000 miles, he became the first person to complete the famous run that Forrest Gump did in the film, and in so doing raised valuable funds and awareness for Peace Direct and World Wildlife Fund. Rob will be discussing some of the key challenges he faced.


Wool: An ancient fibre for the future (11am)

Jen Hunter, of Fernhill Farm, will be sharing her love of wool. Wool has been her passion and concern since 2009 when the devaluation of natural fibres and promotion of synthetics left behind an excellent base material suitable for many industries. As a 2014 Nuffield Farming Scholar she researched global wool industry trends and strives to reposition wool in society as a primary product rather than by-product from the sheep meat industry.


Clean Beauty Panel discussion (12-1pm)

Got a burning question about your beauty products? Wondering what should you be looking out for? Which ingredients you should you be avoiding? Who is offering the best advice? With so many of us struggling with skin sensitivities, keen to detox and interested in wellness, clean beauty is high on the agenda. But what does it really mean? And what should we be considering? Vegan? Organic? Natural? Packaging? How can we make the right choices? All your questions can be answered by our stellar panel of leading lights from the industry.

Katie Hill (editor in chief My Green Pod), Tabitha James Kraan (Pioneer of Organic Hairdressing), Jayn Sterland (Managing Director of Weleda UK), Janey Lee Grace (Director of Imperfectly Natural and BBC Radio 2 Presenter) will be discussing these issues. Jarvis Smith (My Green Pod founder) will chair


Body Confidence Talk & Workshop (1:30pm)

Led by blogger & Social Media influencer Jessica Jones @thefatfunnyone

Digging deeper to look into what is meant by body confidence, how does this impact our lives both daily and in regards to our hopes and dreams. We will discuss the impact that loving our body will make on your life and key ways you can start to have a better relationship with yourself. Many women struggle to feel comfortable in their bodies and who can blame us when society is trying to define what “beautiful” is and not all of us meet the criteria. For me this was the case until one day I decided that enough was enough and embarked on my self love journey. Sponsored by Pudology, the aim for every session is that it will help every woman who attends to feel like a goddess. I want people to feel empowered to start their own self love journey, feel supported and ready to claim their rightful space unapologetically.

The Blog – The Fat Funny One, was born in 2014 and is a huge reason why Jess has become the unapologetic woman she is today. After spending the last few years writing and posting she wanted to create a workshop where she could bring her blog to life and help support women in their own self discovery and self compassion journey.


Can festivals change the way we eat? (2.30pm)

Festivals create a unique opportunity to get people thinking about how and why we eat the way we do, in a fun and creative format.  The visiting public can be taken on a journey that sparks their thinking about the way food is made and can often meet the people who produce it. Some festivals make bold changes to spark debate about the impact industrial farming has on the environment, others take a different approach.

Aine Morris (Abergavenny Food Festival) and Melissa Kidd (Valley Fest/Shambala Festival) will discuss these approaches. Deborah Fraser will chair the discussion.


A growing revolution in Food and Farming (3:30pm)

Dan Huertas and Jonnie Hughes of Silverback Films (Producers of Netflix & WWF series Our Planet) will be talking about the change in amount of meat being eaten and the growing ‘alternative’ meat industry, sustainable palm oil farming, and other smart farming technology.  All of these efficiencies will free up millions of hectares for nature to restore. A revolution in what we eat, and how we grow it, has started against a backdrop of intensive farming which has had dire consequences for the state of our natural world, helping to push almost 1 million creatures toward extinction, and contributing massively to climate change. It will mean that, even with a future human population of 10bn, we’ll be able to feed everyone using less land, and have more wildlife and wild spaces than we have now.

With a passion for all things wild – except spiders – Dan Huertas finally found his natural home in Natural History film-making, relatively late. For the last few years Dan has produced and directed the creation of conservation short films for the global Netflix and WWF project, Our Planet.  Jonnie Hughes spent the last two decades working on all sorts of programmes from live shows like Springwatch, to most recently, a feature film with Sir David Attenborough. As supervising producer on the Netflix/WWF Our Planet project, he is in charge of making a raft of short films that explain to viewers of the series exactly how we can yet save Our Planet – and it is good news!


Designing spaces for the future: community-growing (4.30pm)

We need to change how we grow food with a huge population and shrinking available land. Here we discuss some models of best practice.

Niels Corfield (Edible Cities), Sara Venn (Incredible Edible), Matt Cracknell (Avon Wildlife Trust / Feed Bristol) – Chaired by Deborah Fraser

Niels Corfield working to create sustainable/regenerative landscapes and farms in the UK and Europe. He has practical experience with agroforestry, growing and nursery management. He is an advisor specialising in soils and whole farm design.

Matt Cracknell set up Feed Bristol in 2012 for Avon Wildlife Trust. The aim is to demonstrate the value of nature while establishing a land based business incubator. Feed Bristol brings together a wholistic approach to ecological land management and participatory community development.

Sara Venn works with Incredible Edible – which aims to create kind, confident and connected communities through the power of food.